Baileys Women's Prize For Fiction 2017

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les traductions potentielles des romans notés ici.


Kezako cette histoire d'alcool ?

Un jour de vadrouille numérique, je tombe, au détour d’une ruelle youtube, sur la vidéo passionnante de Lauren, sur sa chaîne Reads and Daydreams : 

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Je découvre alors l’existence d’un prix littéraire UK passionnant : le Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction, qui récompense chaque année un ouvrage de fiction écrit par une femme et paru au UK l’année précédente. Ce prix fut créé en 1996 et jouit d’une belle reconnaissance sur la scène internationale. Et très honnêtement, la sélection 2017 et l’enthousiasme de Lauren ont été comme un sortilège pour moi. J’en suis !

Chaque année, les organisateurs du prix établissent tout d’abord une « longlist » composée de tous les romans correspondant aux critères de sélection du prix, proposés par les éditeurs. Puis dans un second temps, une « shortlist » de six romans est définitivement proposée. Le jury (différent chaque année) devra alors sélectionné le lauréat victorieux !

Afin de poursuivre mes efforts de lecture dans la langue de Shakespeare et de rester aussi connectée à l’actualité littéraire internationale, je me lance un nouveau (encore !) défi de lecture. Bon, pour 2017, j’arrive un peu tard, car j’écris cet article le jour de l’annonce du livre lauréat, mais il n’empêche ! A partir d’aujourd’hui, je vais tenter de lire l’intégralité de la shortlist de chaque édition de ce concours.

Cette page est donc, tout comme l’est la page du Emma Watson Reading Challenge, un classeur récapitulatif de mes lectures ainsi que des chroniques qui en découleront. C’est parti !

Les chroniques de ces romans seront bien entendu ajoutées au fur et à mesure de mes lectures. Si aucun lien n'apparaît, c'est que je n'ai pas encore commencé, pas de panique.

  • Stay With Me / Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀̀
  • The Power  / Naomi Alderman
  • The Dark Circle / Linda Grant
  • The Sport of Kings / C.E. Morgan
  • First Love / Gwendoline Riley
  • Do Not Say We Have Nothing / Madeleine Thien
  • Stay With Me / Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀̀
  • The Power  / Naomi Alderman
  • The Dark Circle / Linda Grant
  • The Sport of Kings / C.E. Morgan
  • First Love / Gwendoline Riley
  • Do Not Say We Have Nothing / Madeleine Thien
  • Stay With Me / Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀̀

    Synopsis

    Yejide is hoping for a miracle, for a child. It is all her husband wants, all her mother-in-law wants, and she has tried everything – arduous pilgrimages, medical consultations, dances with prophets, appeals to God. But when her relatives insist upon a different choice, it is too much for Yejide to bear. It will lead to jealousy, betrayal and despair.

    Unravelling against the social and political turbulence of 80s Nigeria, Stay With Me sings with the voices, colours, joys and fears of its surroundings. Ayobami Adebayo weaves a devastating story of the fragility of married love, the undoing of family, the wretchedness of grief and the all-consuming bonds of motherhood. It is a tale about our desperate attempts to save ourselves and those we love from heartbreak.

  • The Power / Naomi Alderman

    In The Power the world is a recognisable place: there's a rich Nigerian kid who larks around the family pool; a foster girl whose religious parents hide their true nature; a local American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But something vital has changed, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power - they can cause agonising pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world changes utterly.

    This extraordinary novel by Naomi Alderman, a Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year and Granta Best of British writer, is not only a gripping story of how the world would change if power was in the hands of women but also exposes, with breath-taking daring, our contemporary world.
     

  • The Dark Circle / Linda Grant

    The Second World War is over, a new decade is beginning but for an East End teenage brother and sister living on the edge of the law, life has been suspended. Sent away to a tuberculosis sanatorium in Kent to learn the way of the patient, they find themselves in the company of army and air force officers, a car salesman, a young university graduate, a mysterious German woman, a member of the aristocracy and an American merchant seaman. They discover that a cure is tantalisingly just out of reach and only by inciting wholesale rebellion can freedom be snatched. 

  • The Sport of Kings / C.E. Morgan

    The Forges: one of the oldest and proudest families in Kentucky; descended from the first settlers to brave the Wilderness Road; as mythic as the history of the South itself – and now, first-time horse breeders.

    Through an act of naked ambition, Henry Forge is attempting to blaze this new path on the family's crop farm. His daughter, Henrietta, becomes his partner in the endeavour but has desires of her own. When Allmon Shaughnessy, an African American man fresh from prison, comes to work in the stables, the ugliness of the farm's history rears its head. Together through sheer will, the three stubbornly try to create a new future – one that isn't determined by Kentucky's bloody past – while they mould Hellsmouth into a champion.

    The Sport of Kings has the force of an epic. A majestic story of speed and hunger, racism and justice, this novel is an astonishment from start to finish.

  • First Love / Gwendoline Riley

    From “one of Britain’s most original young writers” (The Observer), a blistering account of a marriage in crisis and a portrait of a woman caught between withdrawal and self-assertion, depression and rage.

    Neve, the novel’s acutely intelligent narrator, is beset by financial anxiety and isolation, but can’t quite manage to extricate herself from her volatile partner, Edwyn. Told with emotional remove and bracing clarity, First Love is an account of the relationship between two catastrophically ill-suited people walking a precarious line between relative calm and explosive confrontation.

  • Do Not Say We Have Nothing / Madeleine Thien

    “In a single year, my father left us twice. The first time, to end his marriage, and the second, when he took his own life. I was ten years old.”

    Master storyteller Madeleine Thien takes us inside an extended family in China, showing us the lives of two successive generations—those who lived through Mao’s Cultural Revolution and their children, who became the students protesting in Tiananmen Square. At the center of this epic story are two young women, Marie and Ai-Ming. Through their relationship Marie strives to piece together the tale of her fractured family in present-day Vancouver, seeking answers in the fragile layers of their collective story. Her quest will unveil how Kai, her enigmatic father, a talented pianist, and Ai-Ming’s father, the shy and brilliant composer, Sparrow, along with the violin prodigy Zhuli were forced to reimagine their artistic and private selves during China’s political campaigns and how their fates reverberate through the years with lasting consequences.

    With maturity and sophistication, humor and beauty, Thien has crafted a novel that is at once intimate and grandly political, rooted in the details of life inside China yet transcendent in its universality.
     

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